BEHAVIORAL INTENTION TO UNDERTAKE HEALTH
EXAMINATIONS: TRANSACTION COST THEORY AND SOCIAL EXCHANGE THEORY

Jing-Tang Lin1
Attending Physician, Division of Family Medicine, Department of Community
Medicine, Taoyuan Armed Forces General Hospital, Taiwan
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Po-Chung Chen1
Chief Physician, Division of Family Medicine, Department of Community Medicine, Taoyuan Armed Forces General Hospital, Taiwan
Lecturer, National Defense Medical Center, R.O.C.
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1Both authors contributed equally to this work.

Chen-Ying Su
Associate Professor, Department of Nursing, National Quemoy University, Taiwan.
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Cheng-min Chao*
Corresponding Author: Associate Professor, Department of Business Administration, National Taichung University of Science and Technology, Taiwan
*Corresponding Author: Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Abstract

This paper proposes a conceptual model for understanding the effect of behavioral in-tention in people undertaking health examinations in Taoyuan, Taiwan. To explain and predict this behavioral intention, transaction cost theory (TCT), social exchange theory (SET), and the perceived quality–perceived value–behavior intention (QVB) model were integrated in this study to construct a theoretical model. We administered ques-tionnaires during face-to-face interviews in Taoyuan, Taiwan. All study participants were volunteers. From the 1,830 questionnaires we distributed, we received 1,476 completed questionnaires, resulting in a response rate of 80.7%. The data were analyzed using structural equation modeling to yield the following results. (1) Exchange of in-formation, communication, reputation, and relationship tenure had significant positive effects on both perceived quality and perceived value; (2) uncertainty had significant negative effects on both perceived quality and perceived value; (3) perceived quality had a significant positive effect on perceived value; (4) perceived quality and perceived val-ue had significant positive effects on behavioral intention. Finally, based on empirical evidence, references for formulating strategies were provided for hospitals and for prac-titioners who intended to establish health examination centers.

Keywords: Transaction Cost Theory (TCT), Social Exchange Theory (SET), and Per-ceived Quality-Perceived Value-Behavior Intention Model (Q-V-B model), Health Examinations

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